Year 5

Year 5 Home-based Learning

 

Childline

 

1st June 2020

 

The theme for this week is Kent.

 

 

 

Monday

 

 

 

MORNING

 

SPAG AND GUIDED READING – SEE BELOW

ENGLISH – KENT BELOW

 

MATHS

Please go on to the following website

https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning

Choose Home Learning Year 5 on the right-hand side.

Select appropriate week

Work Through Lesson 1

STEP 1 Watch the video

STEP 2 Carry on with the work which you will find on the website or email

STEP 3 Ask an adult to go through the answers with you

 

READING

Read for 20 minutes.

 

AFTERNOON

 

Choose a subject from the Birds activities grid

 

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

 

As per Monday

 

 

 

Monday SPAG

 

 

MONDAY GUIDED READING

Maidstone’s Iguanodon

A new 50p coin, showing an Iguanodon, whose fossil was found in Maidstone, is to be issued by the Royal Mint. It has been made as a collector’s item and will cost £65.

In 1945 the Iguanodon (also known as Iggy) became part of Maidstone’s coat of arms, along with a lion and the Invicta white horse.  It is the only town in the UK to have a dinosaur in its coat of arms.

In 1834, during the excavation of a quarry, in the Queen’s Road area of Maidstone, a fossil bone was uncovered which appeared to be from an animal of tremendous size. The quarry owner, Willliam Harding Bensted, was an early geologist. He studied the bone carefully and found it was one piece of a skeleton. His notebook about his finds in the quarry is now in Maidstone Museum.

News of the discovery travelled fast and a famous palaeontologist, Gideon Mantell, hurried to Maidstone. He confirmed that the bones had belonged to an Iguanodon. It was a significant find as it was the best fossil of an Iguanodon that had yet been found in the World. Mantell bought the fossil skeleton from Benstead, for the Natural History Museum in London, for £25. It is still on display there and a scientific cast of the fossil can be seen in Maidstone Museum.

In 1822, Gideon’s wife Mary had found some unusual fossilized teeth in Sussex. Mantell later discovered they looked very much like an Iguana’s teeth. The name Iguanodon comes from the Spanish word ‘Iguana’ and the Greek word ‘odon’ meaning ‘tooth’. Mantell believed he had discovered a gigantic extinct reptile. It was the second dinosaur in the World to be identified (the first was Megalosaurus).

It is now thought that Iguanodons would have grown to a length of 6-10 metres, a height of 2.7 metres and weighed 4-5 tons. They were reptiles and herbivores (plant eaters), probably eating cycads, conifers and ginkgos (types of trees), and roamed the swampy countryside in Kent, England, Belgium, Germany, North Africa and the USA, during the Cretaceous period, 135-125 million years ago. They had toothless beaks and tightly packed cheek teeth. Their bodies were bulky with legs that were much larger than their arms and had a stiff tail. They had 3 toed feet with hoof-like claws, while their front legs had 4 fingers and a hard conical spike on each thumb, for defence.

The Maidstone fossil was reclassified (given a new name) in 2012 when it was called Mantellisaurus, a type of dinosaur in the Iguanodon genus (family).

 

Monday – Answer these questions

1. Which is the only town in the UK to have a dinosaur on its coat of arms (a kind of badge in a shield shape)?

2. Where was ‘Iggy’ first found?

3. Why is Iggy now called a Mantellisaurus?

4. If you cane face to face with a live Iguanodon, would it want to eat you?

5. Where can you see Iggy’s fossilized bones today?

 

 

 

ENGLISH

Monday

 

You will be writing a narrative during the first part of the week and then reflecting back on the term later on in the week.

Maidstone's most famous son - its Iguanodon dinosaur - is to be commemorated in a new range of Royal Mint coins.Iggy - as he is popularly known - was exposed during rock-blasting at a ragstone quarry off the Queen's Road in Maidstone in 1834. Have a look at this.

https://www.kentonline.co.uk/maidstone/news/iggys-fame-continues-to-grow-222588/

 

I know that I make up lots of fictional pieces of writing but the above is a real event.

 

Story starters

 

I yawned again and rubbed my eyes, I looked out of the window and gasped…

 

It felt as if someone or something was watching us…

 

As I quickly pushed through the bushes, I found the source of the shrieks, unable to move I watched and froze to the spot. Terrified, I approached the creature slowly, immediately I sensed it needed help..

 

Imagine you awake and peek out of your window, or you are simply walking in Platt Woods and you see this, an iguanodon, last seen in prehistoric Kent, around 125 miliion years ago during the early Cretaceous period.

 

 

Where and when did you see it? What did you see? Who were you with?

What did it look like?

How did you feel?

If you have a sibling or adult nearby, maybe you discuss and tell them all about this creature?

Jot some ideas and maybe draw a picture of your prehistoric creature and note some words around it.

 

Tuesday SPAG

 

Put in the right homophone (their, there, they’re)

1. The teacher told them to leave …….. books on the desk.

2. Billy is always ……. on time.

3. ………. are over 900 students at our school.

4. Ask them if ……….. coming tomorrow.

5. Dad was pleased they had done well in ………. exams.

6. We’ll go to McDonalds if ………. is time.

7. ………. baking a cake for their Grandma.

8. Can you give me ……… telephone number?

9. My parents won’t be coming as ………… both working on Saturday.

 

 

TUESDAY GUIDED READING

Maidstone’s Iguanodon

A new 50p coin, showing an Iguanodon, whose fossil was found in Maidstone, is to be issued by the Royal Mint. It has been made as a collector’s item and will cost £65.

In 1945 the Iguanodon (also known as Iggy) became part of Maidstone’s coat of arms, along with a lion and the Invicta white horse.  It is the only town in the UK to have a dinosaur in its coat of arms.

In 1834, during the excavation of a quarry, in the Queen’s Road area of Maidstone, a fossil bone was uncovered which appeared to be from an animal of tremendous size. The quarry owner, Willliam Harding Bensted, was an early geologist. He studied the bone carefully and found it was one piece of a skeleton. His notebook about his finds in the quarry is now in Maidstone Museum.

News of the discovery travelled fast and a famous palaeontologist, Gideon Mantell, hurried to Maidstone. He confirmed that the bones had belonged to an Iguanodon. It was a significant find as it was the best fossil of an Iguanodon that had yet been found in the World. Mantell bought the fossil skeleton from Benstead, for the Natural History Museum in London, for £25. It is still on display there and a scientific cast of the fossil can be seen in Maidstone Museum.

In 1822, Gideon’s wife Mary had found some unusual fossilized teeth in Sussex. Mantell later discovered they looked very much like an Iguana’s teeth. The name Iguanodon comes from the Spanish word ‘Iguana’ and the Greek word ‘odon’ meaning ‘tooth’. Mantell believed he had discovered a gigantic extinct reptile. It was the second dinosaur in the World to be identified (the first was Megalosaurus).

It is now thought that Iguanodons would have grown to a length of 6-10 metres, a height of 2.7 metres and weighed 4-5 tons. They were reptiles and herbivores (plant eaters), probably eating cycads, conifers and ginkgos (types of trees), and roamed the swampy countryside in Kent, England, Belgium, Germany, North Africa and the USA, during the Cretaceous period, 135-125 million years ago. They had toothless beaks and tightly packed cheek teeth. Their bodies were bulky with legs that were much larger than their arms and had a stiff tail. They had 3 toed feet with hoof-like claws, while their front legs had 4 fingers and a hard conical spike on each thumb, for defence.

The Maidstone fossil was reclassified (given a new name) in 2012 when it was called Mantellisaurus, a type of dinosaur in the Iguanodon genus (family).

Read the text again.

. What do you think Mantell felt when he realized what the fossils were?

. How do you think he would feel to know that the fossils have now been named after him?

. Reread the description of an Iguanodon. Palaeontologists (fossil scientist) often try to work out what dinosaurs looked like from the shape of their skeletons. Can you draw Iggy, from this description, roaming around in Kent?

 

 

 

ENGLISH

 

Tuesday

 

Today you are going to plan your story.

Choose one of the story starters above.

 

A story or narrative needs:

Setting

Build up

Problem

Resolution

Ending

 

How are you going to plan (not write) your story?

Mind map

Story mountain

Story map?

 

Remember to think about the setting and characters.

Think about what the problem could be, maybe the creature is lost? Or it is part of a bigger herd? Maybe it’s come out of hibernation after millions of years and is the only surviving animal? What is it going to do?

 

Plan your story and if you have time jot some words that you might use.

 

 

 

 

Wednesday SPAG

Commas

Can you follow the rules to put the commas in the correct places?  First, you will need to work out where the main and sub-clauses are.

1. The pirate scared of the soldiers jumped into the sea.

2. Feeling happy the three parrots danced on the branch.

3. The man ran through the forest desperate to reach the magical tree.

4. Snarling angrily the Quaswocki glared at his prey.

5. The boys saddened at their situation sat quietly on the beach.

 

Now it gets more difficult.  You need to add a sub or main clause to the sentences below AND put the commas in where necessary.

1. The birds soared through the sky _________________________

2. Singing loudly _________________________________________

3. ________________ looking elated ________________________

4. Enjoying himself immensely _______________________________

5. ____________________________________ feeling hopeful.

 

 

WEDNESDAY GUIDED READING

 

William Caxton (1415 to 1492)

William Caxton brought the technology of printing to England. Before he set up his printing press in Westminster, London around 1476, books were copied out by hand by scribes. These books are called manuscripts (meaning ‘written by hand’ in Latin) and only very rich people and the Church could afford to have them.

Printing had a huge impact. It meant that information and ideas could get to more people, more quickly, and at a more affordable price. In the 15th Century, it changed the World as much as the arrival of the Internet did in the 20th Century.

Caxton was born in Kent. Having had a basic education, he trained to be a merchant. He often worked in Belgium and Germany. Like many people at the time, he was impressed when the first printing press was set up by Johannes Guttenberg in Mainz, Germany. He began to trade in books and learned about printing. In 1472 in Bruges, Belgium, he set up a printing press. He had translated a French romance called ‘The Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye’ and it became the first book ever to be printed in the English language.

A few years later, he brought his printing press to England. The first book he printed in England was ‘The Canterbury Tales’ by Geoffrey Chaucer. At first, it was still mainly wealthy people who could afford to buy books but gradually words in print became available at a cheaper price, meaning more people could own books, learn to read and see and think of new ideas.

Answer these questions:

. Where was William Caxton born?

. How were books made before they were printed?

. What was the first book printed in England?

. How was printing in the 15th Century like the arrival of the Internet?

. Do you think the printing press was an important invention? Explain your answer.

 

 

ENGLISH

 

Wednesday

 

Today you will need to write your story.

Think about using all the language features we have learnt so far.

Remember a story needs to make the reader want to read on.

 

Pointers

Vary the openers

Include different lengths of sentences(simple, compound and complex). Remember to use commas. Think about adverbials and including powerful description, try and show but don’t tell. I would love to see some fronted adverbials with commas in the right place.

It would be great to see some speech but not too much as it can spoil the flow of writing.

Please make sure that you accurately punctuate paragraphs and write at least a page and a half of fantastic narrative.

 

Stop after about 45 minutes and carry on tomorrow. If you are really keen feel free to carry on.

 

 

 

Thursday SPAG

Create sentences using the modal verbs below:

Can

Would

Will

Must

May

Might

 

 

THURSDAY GUIDED READING

 

The Canterbury Tales

 

This book was written towards the end of the 15th Century in Middle English (an older way of speaking English). The Canterbury Tales tells the story of a group of pilgrims going on a journey to show their Christian faith. Starting from the Tabard Inn in Southwark, London, they travel, on foot, to the shrine of St Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral in Kent. As robbers often attacked travellers and stole their money, the pilgrims journeyed together in groups, often with people they had never met before. To pass the time, the book’s characters tell each other stories. The stories are written in the style of poetry. They are sometimes serious, often funny and can be very rude!

 

The pilgrims are from many different walks of life and give us an idea of the type of people who lived at the time. The characters include a priest, a nun, a knight, a cook, a doctor, a merchant and many more. The tales look at the way people think and behave towards each other. Chaucer, as well as being a writer, was an important person in the royal court. He may have based some of the characters on the people he met there.

 

Chaucer was one of the first authors to write in English. Before this time, books were written in Latin or French.

 

This is a description of the knight, in The Canterbury Tales, in Middle English. Can you read it?

 

A knyght ther was, and that a worthy man,

That fro the time that he first bigan

To riden out, he loved chivalrie,

Trouthe and honour, freedom and curteisie.

 

[A knight there was who was a worthy man,

That from the time that he first began

To ride out, he loved chivalry,

Truth and honour, freedom and courtesy.]

 

Answer these questions:

 

. What type of English were ‘The Canterbury Tales’ written in?

. Where did Geoffrey Chaucer work?

. What does the book show us about England in the 15th Century?

. What style of writing was the book written in?

. What sort of character is the knight?

. If you were writing a story about a group of strangers, finding themselves together on the same holiday trip, what sort of characters would you include? What would make an interesting and funny combination of people?

. Middle English was spoken over 500 years ago. Do you think the way people speak English will have changed again in another 500 years?
 

 

ENGLISH

 

Thursday

 

Carry on from yesterday.

If you finished, go through and check for errors and make improvements to your writing. Did you find any mistakes? Have you made any improvements?

How can you ensure you do this the first time that you write?

 

It would be lovely to see the final piece of writing, so do email it to us.

 

 

 

Friday SPAG 

 

 

1.  Add brackets to the sentence below:

 

She finally came to my party three hours late and gave me the biggest hug!

2.  Add a semi colon to the sentence below:

 

 

I went to the shoe shop today I bought loads of trainers.

 

 

3. Underline the relative clause in each sentence.

 

The man, who was reading a book, suddenly looked at me. 

4.  Underline the relative clause in each sentence

 

The pillow, that was filled with feathers, was very uncomfortable. 

Explain what a subordinate and main clause is and how a sentence should be punctuated that includes these.

 

What is a modal verb?

When might you use one?

Can you think of three different types of words that can be used to open a paragraph?

Write three sentences that includes them.

 

 

 

FRIDAY GUIDED READING

 

Anglo Saxon Crystal Balls

 

Archaeologists often excavate burials from the past because what a person was buried with can tell them a lot about what was important to people long ago. Although some have been found in the rest of Europe, it is almost only in Kent, in Britain, that perfectly sphere-shaped quartz crystal balls have been discovered in Anglo Saxon graves.

 

 

These transparent crystal balls are attached to a silver ring and surrounded by two strips of silver crossing over the globe.

 

In Kent, they have always been found in the graves of extremely rich ladies and were lying between the thigh bones of the skeletons. This shows they were probably worn hanging from a belt at the front of their clothing. They are accompanied by silver spoons with tiny holes in their bowls.

 

Nobody knows how or why they were used. Some people think they were magnifying glasses for looking at the delicate, intricate jewellery that the Saxons famously made. Perhaps they were to help start fires. However, others believe they were used for divination (telling the future) or other types of magic. Whatever their purpose they are beautiful, fascinating objects and some can be seen, with their sieve-like spoons in Maidstone museum.

 

Answer these questions:

1. Why do archaeologists often dig up ancient graves?

2. What are the balls made of?

3. Who did they belong to?

4. How were they worn?

5. What has been found with them in the graves?

6. What do you think they were used for? Explain your reason.

 

 

 

ENGLISH

 

 

Friday

 

Time to reflect:

 

I would like you to reflect back on the work you have done at home and consider how you are going to take your learning forward.

Look back at all the English work that you have completed. I would like you to read through each piece of work and then answer the following questions:

 

1)      Which piece of work did you enjoy writing? What made it so enjoyable?

2)      Which piece of work did you find the most challenging? Why do you think this was?

3)      What was your best piece of writing this term? (It may not be the same as your answer to question 1) How can you tell? How could it have been made even better?

4)      I’d like you to think about your writing and its content. Write down three areas that you think you are strong at when writing and where you have several examples. Then, think about two areas that you need to improve at and write them down. (Don’t include handwriting, think about content)

5)      Create a target and write the two areas you are going to improve on in the middle.

These will be your goals for this term. Please email them to us as we would love to see them and we may even add to them.